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Multiple Single-Line Kites

Here are specific examples of Multiple Single-Line Kites

Trains and centipedes

Trains and centipedes are multiple kites of any shape or structure that are connected by lines to each other.

For this competition, at least five kites or segments of the train are required as the minimum number of kites attached to each other to qualify as a train. Centipedes usually have three or four connecting lines and trains usually have one or two. This is not always the case and is not the determining factor.

Each member of the train need not be the same size and shape, but the entire flying structure should be a functional and visual sum of its individual parts.

 

Arch trains

Arch trains consist of multiple kites linked end to end with a common line and tethered (or held in place) at both ends of the train.

Arch ribbons are formed from a continuous piece of fabric that is tethered to the ground (or held in place) at both ends of the ribbon.