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Indoor / zero wind Kites

WINDLESS FESTIVALS

indoor performance kites

Yes, believe it or not, kites can be flown indoors. In fact, indoor kite flying and competition are becoming more and more popular all the time with performers appearing on shows like America’s Got Talent.

Designed to fly in a windless environment, this type of kite is principally designed for indoor use but can also be flown outdoors when light wind would render traditional kite flying impossible.

Indoor/zero wind kites may be of any kite type or design but must be capable of zero wind flight.

Indoor kites are flown by using the relative wind provided by the motion of the kite flier, pulling the sail against the still air in a room.

This motion is typically generated by the user walking slowly backwards or sideways (and often a circular pattern), but it can also be achieved with measured pulls on the kite lines.

WINDLESS FESTIVALS

miniature kites

Some kitemakers find that making very small kites that fly well and are attractive is a special pleasure.

In kitemaking, a kite of less than 12 in. (30 cm) is considered small; kites of about three inches in size are true miniatures.

The special challenge is to keep the kite’s total weight (spars, sail and flying line) as light as possible while still being able to see and handle the small parts without damaging the kite.